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Apr 10, 1634

Robert Rose, 40 and wife Margery, 40 of Elmswell, Suffolk, England, bound for Withersfield, sailed from Ipswitch, England on "The Francis" on April 10, 1634 - Destination: New England. Children listed with them: John, age 15, Elizabeth, age 13, Mary, age 11, Samuell, age 9, Sarah, age 7, Danyell (Daniel), age 3, Darcas (Dorcas), age 3
Source: Passengers to America - pages 44-45.

http://ocotilloroad.com/geneal/geneal.html has a number of Elmswell references: Clarke, Everitt, Wright, Baker, Manning, Pearce

Oct 7, 1813

Ann Brand, being seised in fee of the estate in question, on the 7th of October, 1813, duly executed her last will, which contained a devise in the following words:—" I give and bequeath to Miss Jane Smyth, of Ogle Street, London, all that messuage, farm, lands ...Ann Brand, being seised in fee of the estate in question, on the 7th of October, 1813, duly executed her last will, which contained a devise in the following words:—" I give and bequeath to Miss Jane Smyth, of Ogle Street, London, all that messuage, farm, lands and hereditaments, situate at Elmswell, or in any other parish in the county of Suffolk, during the term of her life, keeping the said estate in good repair.
From Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Court of King's Bench

Oct 7, 1813

The Court of King's Bench, upon that motion being made, directed the following case to be stated for their opinion : Anne Brand being seised iu fee of the estate in question, on the 7th October 1813, duly executed her last will, which contained a devise in the ...The Court of King's Bench, upon that motion being made, directed the following case to be stated for their opinion : Anne Brand being seised iu fee of the estate in question, on the 7th October 1813, duly executed her last will, which contained a devise in the following words: "I give and bequeath to Miss Jane Smyth, of Ogle Street, London, all that messuage, farm lands, and hereditaments situate at Elmswell, or in any other parish in the county of Suffolk, during the term.
From The English Reports

Mar 1814

The testatrix died in March, 1814, without revoking her said will, and the lessor of the plaintiff and the defendant are the devisees therein named, the latter by the name of Sir Henry Smyth. Shortly after the death of the testatrix the Rev. Charles Cook, who was one of her executors, called upon the lessor of the plaintiff for the purpose of paying her the said legacy of 5001., when she refused to receive the same, and she had not received it at the time of the trial.
And from and after her decease, I give and devise the said messuage, farm lands, and hereditaments situate in Elmswell, [ *H3 ] or in any other parish *in the county of Suffolk, unto Sir Henry Smyth, of Beerchurch, in Essex, and his heirs."
From The Revised Reports

1816

1. Harriet RICE , daughter of William RICE ( - ), was born in 1816 (calculated) in Elmswell, Suffolk. From Harriet RICE www.peternewson.co.cc/historiesmysteries ...
Jeanette Weedon (née Phillips) writes:
The properties “Gages” and “Westhaven” [the semi-detached houses in New Road, south of Myrtle Cottage]were not built until 1946/47 by my grandfather, Sidney Phillips, for himself and his son, also Sidney Phillips. “Westhaven” at this time was called “Philomel”. My grandfather lived at Philomel until 1964. My aunt and uncle continued to live at “The Gages” unti their demise in 1997 and 1987 respectively. My cousin Avril Baldwin lived at the Gages with her parents throughout her childhood and adolescent years.
Ipswich Journal newspaper archive

27th October 1753

At Suffolk Quarter Sessions, George Ruffles of Shimpling, Suffolk was convicted before Sir Cordell Firebrace in penalty of £100 for buying and distributing cattle without a certificate, also Alexander Cook of Elmswell. £50 and Robert Sherman of Melton, £10.

10th August 1776

At Bury Assizes: John Howe the younger of Shimpling for riotously forcibly carrying away his father from his house in Elmswell, Suffolk-to pay £10 or 12 months, Valentine Risbrook and four others, Howe's associates, are to pay £5 each or six months, these ruffians with Howe at their head seized a helpless diseased parent and dragged him out of the house upon the ground to a post chaise at the door and thrust him in it and carried him off in the face of the day.

Guest 'Editorial' from local butcher John Simpson, in the ELMSWELL NEWSLETTER, December 1994

I first started in the butchery trade as a Saturday boy for the late Albert Whitehead ofWoolpit, working 8.00 a.m. - 1.00 p.m. every week while finishing my secondary education at Beyton School. It was a job I enjoyed very much but certainly didn't imagine I would continue after leaving Beyton School. My first love was technical drawing and I hoped I would probably end up working as an architect or draughtsman.

But it wasn't to be. Albert offered me a job full time and - ask any butcher - once it's in your blood, butchering is very interesting and addictive.You're hooked and I accepted immediately! I started working full time in 1971, for Albert, learning all aspects of the trade. At the time, he employed three full time butchers, 1 part time and two vans delivering round the surrounding villages.

It was interesting to read what fellow butcher Ernie Goodfellow wrote in the October issue about the cost of meat, the wages and also the standards of butchering and quality of meat, years ago. The standards and quality have certainly dropped since I myself first started in the butchery trade (and I'm a little bit younger than Ernie). You can still buy good quality meat but it gets harder and harder to find. The independent butcher can still compete with the big supermarket chains, through quality and personal service, but with most young couples both having to work, the convenience of buying everything under one roof is a huge factor in modem times.

However I have now been trading in Elmswell for five years, starting from scratch and thankfully getting good and loyal support from Elmswell and the surrounding villages. I owe a lot to the late Albert Whitehead and also David Golding both excellent butchers in their own right and also excellent tutors, from whom I learned a lot, and have reaped the benefits of having my own shop.

I would like to take this opportunity of thanking all my regulars for their loyal support over the last five years (without them I wouldn't be here) and to wish each and every one a merry Christmas, and a happy and prosperous New Year.

JOHN SIMPSON
John's shop is at 25 Pightle Close

{But unfortunately it was not very long after this that his shop closed, and when Ernie retired there were no longer any butchers at all in the village.}