A Guide to the material and how best to see it

Press the F11 key repeatedly and choose the biggest display area.
Can you now see "1024" at the right side of this green bar? If not, click here
1024

Choose any one of three ways to look into the collected material


Are you fairly new to computers - which keys to press? Read this...

It's quite easy to get around this database, just by using the mouse to point at what you want to see and clicking the left-hand mouse button. [If you really can't cope with the mouse, see "Mouseless" below.] And if your screen display seems cramped, click here for some advice.
You will probably notice that as you move the mouse-pointer around the screen it changes its appearance: very often it is an arrow, and changes to a small vertical line ('cursor') if you are pointing at some ordinary text; in both of these forms clicking your mouse button has no effect. But if the pointer changes to a tiny hand and maybe the words (or picture) "light up" a bit, then you are pointing at a "link", and clicking the left mouse-button will send you to a new place - a new page or somwhere else on the same page. Move your pointer across the word "Mouseless" above here, to see what I mean. All the links on this page have been set to have a yellow colour, changing to 'coral' when you point to them.

You probably want the biggest possible viewing area, without too much clutter around the sides of your screen: try pressing the F11 key (on the top row of the keyboard) to see if this improves things. You can get back to where you were by pressing F11 again. You should also close any other windows your browser is showing - "favourites", "history", etc.

One other key you may find really useful: the backspace key. When you click to look at a picture (or sometimes another page having pictures and text) and then want to go back to the page you were previously looking at - Backspace does exactly that. If by any chance the backspace key does not do anything (this can happen occasionally) you must use the mouse to click on the left-arrow button, or a button marked "back", at the top left of your screen.

Scrolling: occasionally you may want to see something you feel sure lies below the bottom edge of the screen (i.e. down the "page"). Find the key on your keyboard marked with a down-arrow , and use this. You will not be surprised if I tell you that the up-arrow and the keys and go upwards and to the sides, the End key takes you to the bottom of the "page" and the Home key takes you back to the top of the page. Why not try the down- and up-keys and the End and Home keys right now? If your mouse has a wheel, this has a similar effect.

Looking for a word on a page: if you hold the control key (marked 'Ctrl') and press the letter ' f ' a small panel appears at the bottom, into which you type the word you are looking for; then click on 'Find next' and the word will be highlighted, if it's there at all. Click again, and the next occurrence will be highlighted. Try this, for example by looking for the word 'mouse' on this page. Now press Escape ('Esc') to close this Find box.

Mouseless

It really is worth learning to cope with a mouse or other pointing device, if you possibly can, as this is the simplest way to follow a link to another page.

If you find it impossible, you can use the Tab key to reach the link you are interested in, then press the big Enter key - usually towards the right of the keyboard and marked . If you repeatedly press 'Tab' right now, you'll see a yellow box with dotted edges which jumps to each of the links on this page one after the other in turn; this dotted-edge box (which might be other than yellow) shows that this link is "active": pressing Enter takes you away to the other end of the link. You can use the 'backspace' key to come back along the same link. Do make good use of the 'backspace' and scrolling keys as described above.

Another hint: holding 'Shift' when you press 'tab' sends the dotted box the other way round the links.

Display trouble? - read this

If you have not already done so, use your F11 key (probably on the top row of your keyboard) to maximise the size of your internet browser window. If the village sign is still under the welcome banner, then read on....

The material on your CD has been designed for computer screens whose display is set to 1024x768 - this means there are 1024 picture points across the width of the screen, and 768 from top to bottom. But if your computer display is set to 800x600 the effect will be that the text tends to be cramped and some pictures will be cut off at the right-hand side.

If you know how to cure this problem yourself, fine; if not, ask a friend or give me (Norman Kenyon) a call. .

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